Select a tool to use:

 Units of measurement conversion

 Brine calculator

 Nitrite calculator

 Brix approximator

 Passive low-temperature cooking calculator

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Select the type of conversion you wish to perform from the list below.

  • Weight Conversion
  • Volume Conversion
  • Weight to Volume Approximation
  • Length Conversion
  • Temperature Conversion

this
amount

of this unit
of measure


equals

of this unit
of measure

Note: the English units used for this conversion are standard American
units. Further conversion may be required if standard Canadian,
Australian, or British units are desired.

Complete the form below to determine the salt, sugar, and curing
mix quantities for a nitrite concentration of 200 ppm.

  • Water:     liter(s)   quart(s)
  • Meat:     kilogram(s)   pounds(s)
  • Percent water in meat:   60%   65%   70%
  • Percent salt in brine:   2%   3%   4%   5%
  • Percent sugar in brine:   1%   2%   3%
  • Percent nitrite in curing mix:   0.625%   6.25%

Salt:  

Sugar:  

Curing salt:  

Complete the form below to determine the curing salt quantity for a nitrite concentration of 120 ppm for use in preparing sausage and other forcemeats.

  • Meat:     kilogram(s)   pounds(s)
  • Percent nitrite in curing mix:   0.625%   6.25%

Curing salt:  

If the final Brix value is known, select “Calculate sugar” to determine how much sugar to add to bring the final solution to this value. If the amount of added sugar is known, select “Calculate Brix” to determine the final Brix value.

  •  Calculate sugar
  •  Calculate Brix
  • Total initial liquid:  grams
  • Natural sugar concentration:  °Bx
  • Final desired sugar concentration:  °Bx

Total added sugar required:   grams

  • Total initial liquid:  grams
  • Natural sugar concentration:  °Bx
  • Added sugar:  grams

Final sugar concentration:   °Bx

A passive means of performing low-temperature cooking has been proposed that requires no temperature-controlled circulator. The circulator is replaced by an insulated container holding hot water and the food item being cooked. The concept is that the temperatures of the hot water and the cold ingredient will balance at the “cooked” temperature desired, in other words, reach a thermodynamic equilibrium. But how hot should the water be? Using the Law of Conservation of Energy, an approximation can be calculated. Complete the form below to estimate the starting temperature of the hot water.

  • Equilibrium temperature:    Celsius (°C)   Fahrenheit (°F)
  • Ingredient:   Specific heat capacity (Kcal/kg°C): 
  • Ingredient mass:    kilogram(s)   pounds(s)
  • Ingredient start temperature:  °F
  • Water volume    liter(s)   quart(s)

Starting water temperature:  

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